Modeling a simple house Part 2

In this part we will go through windows, doors, and balconies creation. If you are new to this tutorial, you should start from the Part 1 first and then continue with this one.

STEP 1

Ok, we will cut to the chase straight away. We’ll start this one off with making holes for windows and doors. So, using command, just outline the windows and doors.

image 1

image 1

You can actually use the curves from the plans, it might even speed up this process, but I like it this way. After you’ve created all the rectangles needed, we will next create holes with command.

image 2

image 2

Once you’ve done that (I’ll do the roof windows later) we need to create the windows and doors to fill those holes we just made. So, if you haven’t already, outline other lines on the windows plans. For each window or door we need 3 sets of rectangles. We already have one set. Then we will use outer 2 and using command we will extrude by 1 unit with Cap set to Yes.

image 3

image 3

Then, repeat the ExtrudeCrv command with inner two rectangles.

image 4

image 4

Then, using , just create surface out of inner Rectangle.And move the middle extruded part towards inside by 0.5.

image 5

image 5

To make it a bit more realistic, you can fillet the edges with command and 0.1 as radius.

image 6

image 6

Now, we’ll need to position this window. it towards the inside of wall by 0.5.

image 7

image 7

The process for the doors and other windows is pretty much the same. the objects that are the same and you already modeled them, and model the other windows and doors.

image 8

image 8

Now, let me go back to the roof windows. The problem here is the windows are tilted under certain degree. This way it is pretty hard to model, because everything then is defined by that degree. But thankfully,  since Rhino is such great tool, it lets us adjust CPanel (construction panel) so that the cp is tilted, and when we model on such cpanel, then everything else is normal, modeling wise.

Lets first create some more Rectangles for the windows outlines. After that, just the rectangles onto the roof (do that from either front or back viewport because that is the projection direction we need).

image 9

image 9

We will set the CPlane orientation, so from Perspective view select one projected rectangle and right click on the “Perspective” name in the viewport, and select Set CPlane->To Object.

image 10

image 10

Now it is fairly easy to do anything with this rectangle. So, lets first create the set of 3 rectangles for each window we need. each Rectangle to the inside first by 1 unit, then by 0.5. And using MakeHole we will create holes for the windows:

image 11

image 11

Using the same method we used for the other windows, we will create these roof windows.

image 12

image 12

For the balconies detailes, I believe you can figure that out on your own. If not, let me know, I’ll explain. Basically all you need is to create with 1×1 base, and height the same as on the plans.

Anyway, I hope this was helpful.

4 Responses to “Modeling a simple house Part 2”

  1. […] Modeling a simple house Part 2 « Rhinoceros 3D Help – Tutorials, Links, Galleries, Forum… says: November 4, 2009 at 12:32 am […]

  2. g.sahin says:

    it s a great tutorial for the ones who just start to learn modelling with Rhino. Thanks a lot!!

  3. Hey!
    This is a great tutorial for beginners, thank you very much. I learned all I needed to learn to star modeling houses. I have a question, do you have a tutorial for texturing this kind of house. I really want to get in to the business of 3d modeling. And would love to learn how to begin texturing a house so it looks realistic enough.

    regards

    Jorge

  4. Giovanni says:

    How light on Video Card is Rhino with OpenGL! I’m a 3ds Max (Design) user. The 2009 version is so ugly heavy on ram, that you must restart the program after a 2-hour use for purging cache and resetting the paging file. I’ve being using Rhino for about 20 hours and it never crashed! And it’s an evaluation version! PF on task manager at he end of this tutorial is less than 1GB! The file is about 2MB, with all of those curves and surfaces. The same file on Max would be 30 MB at least! You can’t count Max crashes, nor the number of service packs to fix the bugs. Let’s not talk about that mess with Direct 3D performance drivers! Instead of renewing Autodesk 3ds Max subscription, which is so expensive, I’m surely buying Rhino.

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